Perchlorate

Perchlorate Found in Fireworks and Explosives

Perchlorate

Certified for Perchlorate Analysis Under NELAC

Perchlorate

Perchlorate (ClO4-) is an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground water and surface waters from the dissolution of ammonium, potassium, magnesium, or sodium salts. There have been large volumes of perchlorate being disposed of since the 1950's and perchlorate has been detected in at least 14 states, every state having a confirmed perchlorate manufacturer or user. In 2001 the EPA began requirement for monitoring this contaminant in the nation's drinking water and in 2002 the US EPA submitted a proposed reference dose of 1 part-per-billion (ppb) for perchlorate in drinking water based on perceived changes in infant rat brain structure at a dose equivalent to 300 ppb for a 150 pound human adult or as low as 45 ppb for a bottle-fed infant. Regulatory pressures to reduce perchlorate concentrations in surface and ground water have been increasing.

Perchlorate is commonly found in accelerants such as fireworks and explosives used in construction for blasting purposes. Perchlorate from these items contaminates the ground water and surface water which then creates the possibility it may show up in your drinking water. There is also some evidence that the chlorinated substances that the water treatment facilities use to disinfect the water before distribution may contain perchlorate if it has been exposed to heat, light or has been sitting around for an extended amount of time. Exposure to these elements may cause a chemical reaction converting the chlorine into perchlorates. Water supplied by the town is usually tested for this possibility but if you get your water from a private well you should consider testing for perchlorate.

ChemServe is certified for perchlorate analysis under NELAC and for the more stringent Massachusetts perchlorate drinking water program protocol and can identify any potential perchlorate to as low as 0.300ppb (parts per billion).